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  1. #101
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    9/11 Autopsy Guidelines Plan Abandoned

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...sn=001&sc=1000

    By LARRY McSHANE, Associated Press Writer
    Saturday, November 18, 2006 04 53 PM

    (11-18) 16:53 PST New York (AP) -- An effort to create standard autopsy guidelines that could document a link between toxic air at ground zero and deaths of 9/11 rescue workers has been abandoned by the federal government amid concerns the information collected could be misinterpreted.

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, in a note posted Friday on its Web site, said the agency "instead will pursue other avenues for documenting long-term health effects from exposure to air contaminants from the World Trade Center disaster."

    Outside medical experts who reviewed the plan suggested focusing on monitoring epidemiological patterns of disease in those exposed.

    In a Sept. 15 draft, the institute proposed examining specific sections of the lungs and creating a "tissue bank" to preserve certain organs and bodily fluids for later testing.

    The institute said reviewers had raised several questions, including concerns that "the draft document could be misinterpreted or misapplied, hindering rather than furthering progress in addressing WTC health concerns."

    "This study has many insurmountable barriers to overcome," wrote Dr. David J. Prezant, chief medical officer for the city Fire Department. Prezant, whose review was posted on the Web site, said one of those barriers was the "politics of causality," a reference to pending lawsuits filed against the city by injured workers.

    Because autopsy results are often used in civil lawsuits, the results collected by the institute — while intended as a scientific study — could be used as a trial tool for lawyers and others with an "undeniable self-interest" in the cause of death, Prezant said.

    The collapse of the twin towers sent thick plumes of concrete dust, fiberglass, asbestos and lead into the air in lower Manhattan. The tainted air was taken in by thousands of ground zero workers in the weeks after the terrorist attack that killed 2,749 people.

    The guidelines were intended to be used nationwide in cases such as the death of New York City police detective James Zadroga, who died last January. Zadroga spent 470 hours working amid the toxic fumes, and fell ill within weeks.

    An autopsy found the 34-year-old detective died as a result of ground zero exposure, finding that there was material "consistent with dust" found in his lungs.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  2. #102
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    Extended Interview: Researcher Discusses Health of 9/11 First Responders
    Philip Landrigan, chairman of the Community and Preventive Medicine Department at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York, discusses the department's recent report on the health of 9/11 first responders.

    http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/scien...gan_11-21.html

    11/21/2006

    TOM BEARDEN: Mt. Sinai has just completed a major study of the people who responded to the World Trade Center. What did you find?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: Well, we reported on about 9,200 workers: firefighters, police, construction workers, other responders at the World Trade Center site. The major finding that we recorded was that approximately 60 percent of these people had developed new respiratory symptoms since starting work at Ground Zero.

    TOM BEARDEN: Sixty percent is significant.

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: Sixty percent is very significant and it's much higher than we would expect in the general American population. And our assessment of the severity of the situation was heightened by the finding that in roughly two-thirds of these people the signs and symptoms were so persistent two or three years later.

    TOM BEARDEN: What kind of problems did you find?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: Well, first of all we found upper respiratory problems. Very ... nasty, very acute sinusitis in a lot of these folks. And then also lower respiratory problems -- cough, wheeze.

    And then objectively going beyond just symptoms, we actually did what are called pulmonary function tests where people are asked to blow hard and fast into a tube and measure how much air they move in a given period of time. And we found lots of evidence in that test for pulmonary restriction, which is to say shrinkage in the volume of the lungs. And in one particular test the frequency for evidence of restriction was five times what we would expect in the general population of the U.S.

    TOM BEARDEN: We spoke with two police detectives -- one who has cancer, has leukemia, and the other who has lost 50 percent of his kidney function. Is it possible to attribute those sorts of problems to Ground Zero?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: Up until now we've been focusing on two things -- respiratory problems and mental health problems. Because it was clear to all of us that those were the two categories of disease that were going to be most important in the first five years after the attacks.

    Now that we've gotten past the five-year point and we're moving into the period of time when you would begin to expect to see diseases that have a long [incubation] period, we're actually engaged in a process right now to develop criteria for which other diseases such as cancer, such as chronic lung disease, such as kidney disease, such as other diseases like he included on that list.

    TOM BEARDEN: But it's too early to know for sure?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: We're working to get it right because all recognize that it's very important that the list has to be accurate. We have to be sure to provide benefits to anybody who deserves benefits and we don't want to make any mistakes.

    Range of illnesses
    TOM BEARDEN: Of the 60 percent of the people that you've identified so far, how would you characterize the seriousness of the problems that they've suffered?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: There's a range of course, and what we found was that the people who had the most serious disease are the people who were there first. The people who actually were engulfed in the dust cloud that we all saw on TV on 9/11 are far and away the most seriously affected.

    Then the next most seriously affected are the folks who arrived in the first 24 hours but missed the actual dust cloud. Next most seriously affected are the people who arrived 24 or 48 or 72 hours after the events, and so on down.

    And actually the fact that there is that internal gradient -- that internal dose response -- strengthens our feeling that this is a true cause and effect relationship that we're seeing.

    We think that the likely cause ... of all the respiratory problems lies in the chemical nature of the dust. The major component of the World Trade Center dust was pulverized concrete. Cement. Which was very, very alkaline. Had a pH of 10 or 11, which means that the alkalinity of this material is equivalent to that of Drano.

    And moreover it was in finely particulate form, so that when people inhaled this stuff it actually had the capacity to adhere to the lining of the trachea, the bronchi, and even -- because it was small -- moved on into the depths of these people's lungs.

    And we think that's why the material was so incredibly toxic per unit weight. Then of course in addition to the pulverized cement, there were billions and billions of microscopic shards of glass from all the blown out windows and various chemical contaminants.

    TOM BEARDEN: An attorney who represents some of those people who are involved in a class action suit believes there was perhaps an accelerating in the mixture of the chemicals and so forth that was in the cloud that might make these more serious diseases appear more quickly. Is that possible?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: It's possible. We certainly know of other instances of synergy, acceleration between chemicals. The classic example that was recognized 30 years ago ... was the synergy that existed between asbestos and cigarette smoke. We know that asbestos workers who smoke cigarettes had much more lung disease, specifically much more lung cancer, than asbestos workers who didn't smoke. So the notion of plausibility is certainly real and we need to explore it in the case of 9/11 people.

    TOM BEARDEN: Is there a timeframe -- that a clock is ticking right now, if you will -- that will require a period of time for studies to link directly to cause and effect, or is that pretty much established now?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: I would consider it quite well established in the case of the pulmonary disease that we're seeing, and quite well established in the case of the mental health problems that we're seeing. And still a work in progress for some of the other conditions.

    TOM BEARDEN: How long would the other conditions take to become apparent scientifically?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: That is not entirely certain. And the thing is here, we just don't know with any absolute certainty how many years it will take for various other diseases to appear in these folks. Will it be one year, three, five, 10, 20?

    We know for example in the case of the cancers caused by asbestos that they can appear as long as four and five decades after the fact. That's probably longer than most, but still gives you a sense of the time frame that we're operating in. So I think our responsibility as doctors who are caring for these people is to continue to examine them conscientiously, to continue to publish our reports every couple of years as new data become available, and continuously to sift the evidence and see what the connections are.

    And at the same ... we need to work with the folks who are appropriating new funds to make sure that this is a study with uninterrupted stream of funding, to support these examinations so that we're in a position to see new diseases as they appear.

    Funding of health evaluations
    TOM BEARDEN: Do you think that there's a danger that the government -- state, local and federal -- might forget about this and that that steady funding stream that you think is so important might dry up?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: I don't think there's a real risk that government will forget the workers of 9/11. These folks are national heroes. They rushed into the scene at Ground Zero hours after the attack on the towers and some of them continued to labor there for six months. I think that ... at all levels of government, city, state and federal, there is such support for continuing evaluations for these workers. I simply cannot conceive that it would go away.

    TOM BEARDEN: Those two first responders I mentioned earlier told us about how they went home with this stuff all over their clothes, and they took it home and their families were exposed to it. Are you concerned about health risks to those people secondarily as well?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: Well, there have been numerous examples recorded in occupational medicine of people carrying toxins home with them from the workplace to cause illness in their families. It's been seen in lead workers, it's been seen in asbestos workers, it's been seen in workers in pesticide plants. And so yes, we need to be concerned in this instance.

    TOM BEARDEN: Can you put a number on the number of people we might be talking about here ultimately?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: We have reasonable estimates of the number of people who worked at Ground Zero and at the other sites that were directly exposed to the dust, such as the Fresh Kills Landfill, and it's somewhere between probably 40,000 and 60 or 70,000.

    We're working right now with the city health department to refine that number. What's more difficult to calculate is the total number of people outside the workplace in ... Manhattan who were exposed to the dust. The city health department has set up a registry and they're working very hard to try to come up with a very accurate estimate of that.

    TOM BEARDEN: Is it possible to say what the lower and upper numbers of those might be?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: I'd rather not commit at this point.

    Reaching out to workers
    DAVID STEPHEN: As science goes through its process of determining what happened and what to do about it, is there a risk that people may die in the meantime because they're getting sicker faster than anybody anticipated?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: Well, I think one of the very strong arguments for continuing the medical monitoring and medical follow-up of the responders at the World Trade Center is that we need to be in a position to document any accelerated occurrence of disease. So I think it's a good idea that we should see each of these people every one to two years, that way if any disease of rapid onset is developing, we'll pick it up early.

    And picking it up early has two benefits. First off it means that we can put those people on treatment as soon as we pick up their disease, and secondly, early detection means that we'll be in a position as rapidly as possible to recognize emerging patterns of disease so that we can consider interventions that go beyond the treatment of the individual worker.

    DAVID STEPHEN: So the solution then is to monitor and to pick up any problems [in] as many people as possible on an ongoing basis?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: Absolutely. Yes, the solution to the risk of early emergence of disease is continuing follow-up -- periodic exams every one to two years, continuing surveillance of the data so that we're in a position to observe patterns as they develop, and then of course intervention.

    DAVID STEPHEN: How do you reach those folks who may not want to know, and they're worried about going to see a doctor?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: Well you know, in all my years as a doctor, one of the constant struggles is to persuade people who are fearful of the medical profession to come in for examinations ... it becomes very important that we as physicians reach out to those people, that we persuade them that we need to overcome that fear of examination, come in and be checked.

    And the reason that it's important that they be checked is not that they be given bad news, but rather that we're then in a position to intervene quickly and effectively to minimize the risk of disease, or minimize the risk of premature death.

    We have developed a very active program of outreach to the workers who were down at Ground Zero and we're constantly sending out messages. We're doing some in multiple languages because we realize that the workers came from many different backgrounds and a very substantial [part of] our budget is for this outreach effort. We take it very seriously.

    Learning from the past
    DAVID STEPHEN: Some people see some historical precedence for what's happening here. They see it in the atomic veterans who were exposed to fallout from the nuclear attacks. They see it in the dioxin issues. They see it in Gulf War syndrome. They see it in Agent Orange and it seems to them at least that science is always about 10 years or 20 years behind in terms of determining who got hurt by what and who's going to pay for all this treatment. Is that something that, that's happening here too?

    PHILIP LANDRIGAN: I think we've learned from past crises. For example, I sat on federal advisory boards on dioxin. I was a member of the Presidential Advisory Commission under President Clinton on Gulf War veterans' illnesses. The medical profession has learned from those past experiences how to mobilize in the aftermath of this kind of disaster, how to separate truth from untruth, how to focus resources to the benefit of patients.

    And I would argue that the response here has been much more rapid, much more focused and much more compassionate than it was in any of the previous crises. I mean we were starting to see patients -- World Trade Center responders -- within a month or so of September 11th, 2001, and the pace we're seeing patients has only accelerated since that time. We've seen now a total of over 17,000 patients at Mt. Sinai and the fire department has seen another 13 or 14,000. So roughly 30,000 between us. That's an extraordinary response and unmatched by anything that I can recall in any of the previous events that you mentioned.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  3. #103
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    I don't think there's a real risk that government will forget the workers of 9/11. These folks are national heroes. They rushed into the scene at Ground Zero hours after the attack on the towers and some of them continued to labor there for six months. I think that ... at all levels of government, city, state and federal, there is such support for continuing evaluations for these workers. I simply cannot conceive that it would go away.

    Liar.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  4. #104
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    A Push to Include 9/11 Health in Upcoming Presidential Budget Proposal
    Reps. Maloney and Fossella are joined by 25 colleagues in bipartisan call for funding, federal plan

    http://maloney.house.gov/index.php?o...1238&Itemid=61

    WASHINGTON, DC – As the White House prepares an FY2008 budget proposal to be released early next year, 27 bipartisan Members of Congress are asking President Bush to include robust funding for comprehensive medical monitoring and treatment of those made sick by the toxic air around Ground Zero (letter to Bush). The group, led by Reps. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) and Vito Fossella (R-NY), also urged the president to direct the Department of Health and Human Services to develop a plan for the federal response to the 9/11 Health Crisis.

    “Just because the fifth anniversary of 9/11 has passed and the attention is elsewhere doesn’t mean that the 9/11 Health Crisis is going away,” said Maloney. “The men and women who breathed in the toxic air around Ground Zero will be feeling the serious effects for many years, and the federal response needs to reflect that. The federal government needs to view this as a long-term issue, as the doctors have testified, and it needs a plan that includes regular and serious funding in the federal budget to provide help to these heroes.”

    Fossella said, “We have made progress over the last year to begin getting the resources necessary to help our 9/11 heroes. However, we now need a significant investment by the federal government into health monitoring and treatment for those who are sick or injured. In addition, the federal government must develop a comprehensive plan to address the health impacts of 9/11.”

    In October, $52 million, the very first federal dollars for the treatment of those suffering from 9/11-related illness, was released by the Department of Health and Human Services. Secretary Michael Leavitt has acknowledged that this money was only a “down payment,” and doctors who have monitored sick responders have testified before Congress that the crisis must be viewed as a problem that will persist for a few decades, not just a few years.

    Signing the letter to Bush were: Reps. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY), Vito Fossella (R-NY), Carolyn McCarthy (D-NY), Diane Watson (D-CA), Joseph Crowley (D-NY), John Sweeney (R-NY), Brian Higgins (D-NY), Steve Israel (D-NY), Peter King (R-NY), Christopher Shays (R-CT), Tim Bishop (D-NY), Thad McCotter (R-MI), Eliot Engel (D-NY), Michael McNulty (D-NY), Howard Berman (D-CA), Jos Serrano (D-NY), Ed Towns (D-NY), Gary Ackerman (D-NY), Lynn Woolsey (D-CA), Major Owens (D-NY), Nita Lowey (D-NY), Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), Chris Smith (R-NJ), John Conyers (D-MI), Maurice Hinchey (D-NY), Anthony Weiner (D-NY), Gregory Meeks (D-NY).
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  5. #105
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    Death by Dust
    The frightening link between the 9-11 toxic cloud and cancer

    http://villagevoice.com/news/0648,lombardi,75156,2.html

    by Kristen Lombardi
    November 28th, 2006 5:22 PM

    (Gold9472: Too long to post... read the link.)
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  6. #106
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    9/11 Workers Get Help From College Center

    http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?n...d=574902&rfi=6

    by Liz Rhoades, Managing Editor
    11/30/2006

    When it starts a new program in a few weeks, a Queens health monitoring center will give hope to ailing emergency responders and other people who worked at the World Trade Center site following the Sept. 11 attacks.

    Queens College’s Center for the Biology of Natural Systems has been awarded a federal $1.1 million grant from the National Institute For Occupational Safety and Health to evaluate and treat individuals suffering from World Trade Center related health conditions. The center has provided health monitoring exams for over 1,000 former ground zero workers since 2004.

    “We are very happy about the funding,” said Dr. Steven Markowitz, director of the center, which is located at 163 03 Horace Harding Expressway in Flushing. “Now we can provide the health care directly.”

    Legal paperwork is holding up the opening, but in a few weeks it is expected to be ready, with an increased staff of one or two. The current staff of 10 includes an occupational health physician and a lung doctor. Some cases will be referred to other specialists.

    When the World Trade Center collapsed, no one thought about major health risks for the rescue and cleanup workers. “It was a terribly unsafe place to work,” Markowitz said. “Some workers didn’t have much respiratory protection, but the government told them it was safe.”

    Although the health conditions vary, the center has seen patients suffering from throat and sinus problems, acid reflux and mental health issues, but mostly lung and upper airway problems.

    There have been some cancer cases, but the director said there is not enough evidence to connect them to the fallout from the World Trade Center. “It’s difficult, because there is no smoking gun,” he said. “Respiratory cases are easier to confirm.”

    He noted that some workers got sick right away while others weren’t affected for months. Even people working on the perimeter of the devastation have been affected, he noted.

    “We have seen a lot of sick people from Queens,” Markowitz said. “A quarter of all those screened here lived in Queens at the time (of the terrorist attack).”

    He expects people previously untested, who worked at ground zero, to come into the center. “We encourage it,” he added.

    Although the federal grant is only for one year, Markowitz is hopeful that it will be extended. Patient monitoring, however, through periodic health exams will continue through May 2009.

    The Center for the Biology of Natural Systems was started in 1981 and focuses on environmental and occupational health research. Earlier this year, it received a $19.5 million federal grant to expand its lung cancer screening project.

    The group also has a mobile lab to test air quality in neighborhoods with high asthma rates and reaches out to day laborers, mainly immigrants, through a Woodside based community outreach center.

    Markowitz is an internist and occupational health physician. He joined the center in 1998 and became its director in 2000.

    Reflecting on the ground zero cleanup effort, he noted that there was extra pressure to get the work done, under unhealthy conditions. “The irony is everything is back to normal and now the site just sits there. What was the hurry?”

    The World Trade Center treatment program is free to all ground zero responders who are enrolled or eligible for enrollment in the medical monitoring program. For more information, call Lauri Boni at (718) 670 4191. For an appointment, call (718) 670 4216.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  7. #107
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    State Lawmakers Ask President For 9/11 Health Care Funding

    http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index...id=1&aid=64751

    December 01, 2006

    Senator Hillary Clinton, Chuck Schumer, and Edward Kennedy wrote a letter to President George W. Bush Friday, to make sure those suffering 9/11 related health problems get adequate funding in the president's 2008 budget proposal.

    Studies show that 70 percent of World Trade Center responders have new or worsened respiratory problems caused by their work at the site. The letter also requests money from the Department of Health to cover a funding gap until federal legislation is passed.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  8. #108
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    Kevin Barrett Interviews Les Jamieson
    Thanks to www.rbnlive.com

    Part I
    Click Here

    Part II
    Click Here

    The topic of discussion is the environmental impact of 9/11.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  9. #109
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    FEDERAL PROBE OF CITY $1B 9/11 FUND

    http://www.nypost.com/seven/12032006...an_edelman.htm

    (Gold9472: Scumbags.)

    December 3, 2006 -- The federal Department of Homeland Security has launched an investigation into the city's $1 billion World Trade Center insurance company, which has spent more than $50 million fighting claims by ailing 9/11 responders.

    The probe will look into charges by Rep. Jerrold Nadler, spurred by reports in The Post, that the company has violated congressional intent and misspent federal money to dispute more than 6,400 claims.

    "I can confirm we are looking into the issues raised by Rep. Nadler," said Tamara Faulkner, a spokeswoman for the department's inspector general, Richard Skinner.

    Faulkner said a team of inspectors with subpoena power will scrutinize the WTC Captive Insurance Co, which manages $1 billion Congress approved to pay claims against the city and its contractors from the WTC cleanup.

    A report is expected in six to eight months.

    The company, governed by five Bloomberg administration officials, would not comment last week, but has argued it has a "duty to defend" against the claims.

    Records obtained by The Post show the company has spent more than $50 million on overhead, consultants and fees as of Sept. 30, including $32.9 million on law firms.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  10. #110
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    Time running out for WTC workers

    http://www.courierpostonline.com/app...1/61204011/-1/

    By TODD B. BATES
    Monday, December 4, 2006

    Tens of thousands of paid workers and volunteers participated in rescue, recovery or cleanup efforts following the World Trade Center terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

    But only a fraction of them have registered with the New York State Workers' Compensation Board to remain eligible for workers' compensation benefits if they get sick down the line.

    They have until mid-August to register, under a New York state law signed by Gov. George E. Pataki.

    "I think that there are upward of 100,000 people who are eligible under this program," including thousands of New Jersey residents, said Jonathan Bennett, spokesman for the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health. The nonprofit group provides occupational safety and health training, advocacy and information to workers and unions in the New York metro area.

    The new law gives people more time to file a claim for workers' compensation benefits if they register before Aug. 14, 2007, according to a New York state statement on the Web.

    If you're already ill, you can file a claim for worker's compensation after registering, according to a fact sheet on the Web.

    The Rev. Denise P. Mantell of Matawan, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church there, said she plans to register.

    "I'm glad that ... the powers that be have pushed through the ... needs of the people" and many "will get help that they need," Mantell said.

    She developed lung cancer after spending hundreds of hours volunteering and helping people at or close to the World Trade Center site. She's had surgery to remove a malignant tumor as well as chemotherapy.

    "I'm doing pretty good," Mantell said.

    The reason the law changed is that in many cases, the symptoms people developed as a result of working at ground zero "did not reveal themselves until significant time later," said Jon A. Sullivan, spokesman for the New York State Workers' Compensation Board in Albany.

    The collapse of the World Trade Center towers released tremendous quantities of smoke, dust and gases into the air, studies say. Ground zero fires, which released more pollutants, burned for more than three months.

    Thousands of rescue and recovery workers and volunteers have had respiratory and other ailments, as an estimated 40,000 were exposed to caustic dust and toxic contaminants, according to experts.

    About 18,000 people have been examined as part of a multi-clinic medical monitoring program coordinated by Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, according to Dr. Iris Udasin1 and information on the World Trade Center Medical Monitoring Program Web site.

    As of the end of October, 1,445 people from New Jersey had gone to clinics, said Udasin, an associate professor and director of employee health at the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute and UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School's Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine in Piscataway.

    Probably about half of the 1,445 have gone to the institute's Clinical Center, said Udasin, an East Brunswick resident.

    Dozens from Monmouth and Ocean counties have been examined there, she has said.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


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