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Thread: CIA Admits It Destroyed Tapes Of Interrogations

  1. #111
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    CIA admits it destroyed 92 interrogation tapes

    http://rawstory.com/news/2008/Breaki...apes_0302.html

    3/2/2009

    While it has been known for some time that the CIA had destroyed tapes of interrogations with terrorism suspects, Monday's news that 92 videotapes had been destroyed by the agency was still shocking.

    The CIA acknowledged the number of tape erasures in a letter filed by government lawyers in New York. The letter was filed in response to an ongoing lawsuit from the the American Civil Liberties Union that is seeking more details of terror interrogation programs.

    The ACLU immediately called for the judge to issue a "prompt finding of contempt" against the CIA.

    Amrit Singh, an attorney with the ACLU and counsel on the case said to Raw Story, “The large number of video tapes destroyed confirms that this was a systemic attempt to evade court orders.”

    Singh added, "It’s about time, now that the court knows 92 tapes have been destroyed, that it hold the CIA accountable for the destruction of the tapes."

    The letter was submitted when the court's stay of consideration of the ACLU's contempt motion expired on Feb. 28. John Durham, the acting United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, who is conducting the criminal investigation into the destruction of any interrogation tapes, did not request an additional stay.

    According to the letter, which can be viewed here, the CIA is now gathering information in response to the Court’s order to provide a list identifying and describing each of the destroyed records, as well as transcripts or summaries from any of the destroyed records and the names of any witnesses who may have viewed the videotapes before their destruction. The CIA requested that it be given until March 6 to provide the court with a timeline for its response to the requested information.

    In December 2007, the ACLU filed a motion to hold the CIA in contempt for its destruction of videotapes in violation of a court order requiring the agency to produce or identify all the requested records. That motion is still pending, according to a release from the ACLU.

    The ACLU contends that the tapes should have been identified and processed in response to its FOIA request for information on the treatment and interrogation of detainees in U.S. custody.

    The tapes became a contentious issue in the trial of Sept. 11 conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui, after prosecutors initially claimed no such recordings existed, then acknowledged two videotapes and one audiotape had been made.

    This latest news of CIA tape erasures dovetails into Senate plans to hold a review of the agency's detention and interrogation program. The Senate Intelligence Committee plans to investigate whether the steps taken by the CIA to detain and interrogate terrorism suspects were properly authorized.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  2. #112
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    Feds probably won't charge anyone for destroying CIA tapes
    Interrogators, incinerators likely to escape charges

    http://rawstory.com/news/2008/Feds_u..._for_0303.html

    3/3/2009

    Even though he has yet to complete his investigation, a federal prosecutor has already signaled that he is unlikely to indict any CIA employees for incinerating 92 secret interrogation tapes that purportedly show suspects being waterboarded.

    Lost in the flood of reports about the CIA admitting the destruction of 92 interrogation tapes in a government legal filing were new and potentially details. Sources close to an ongoing probe told The Washington Post that they expect no one at the CIA will be charged.

    Obama CIA Director Leon Panetta previously told a confirmation committee that there were no plans to prosecute those involved in former President George W. Bush's interrogation program, which critics -- and Panetta -- describe as torture. But the new revelation that federal prosecutor John Durham won't charge CIA operations employees with what appears to have been obstruction of justice, raises the stakes even higher.

    In fact, the CIA said it destroyed the tapes to protect the identities of agents involved in the interrogation program.

    Further, the government knows who ordered the tapes destruction. Then-directorate of operations chief Jose A. Rodriguez gave the order to destroy the tapes in 2005. Since then, the CIA says they've discontinued taping detainees.

    Federal prosecutor John "Durham appears unlikely to secure criminal indictments against Rodriguez and other agency operations personnel involved in the conduct," three sources told the Post. "In recent months, the prosecutor has focused special attention on CIA legal advisers who reviewed court directives and on agency lawyers who told Rodriguez that getting rid of the recordings was sloppy and unwise but that it did not amount to a clear violation of the law, the sources said.

    The prosecutor has also obtained e-mail messages and internal memoranda that detail the "jarring or unpleasant substance" or the interrogations, the report added -- which purportedly include waterboarding.

    "At issue are recordings that chronicle the interrogation of two senior al-Qaeda members... while they underwent a simulated drowning practice known as waterboarding and in less hostile moments as they interacted with agency employees or sat in their prison cells," government officials speaking under the condition of anonymity said.

    According to the letter the government filed Monday disclosing the number of tapes destroyed, the agency has asked for an extension until Friday to provide the names of witnesses who might have viewed the tapes before they were destroyed.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  3. #113
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    CIA destroyed 12 tapes showing 'enhanced interrogation methods'

    http://rawstory.com/news/2008/CIA_de...nced_0306.html

    3/6/3009

    The American Civil Liberties Union has received new information about 92 interrogation videotapes which were previously revealed to have been destroyed by the CIA.

    Documents provided on Friday to a federal court in New York indicated that twelve of the 92 tapes depicted "enhanced interrogation methods." Ninety of those tapes showed one detainee and the other two a second detainee. However, the inventory of the tapes was almost entirely redacted.

    "The government is needlessly withholding information about these tapes from the public, despite the fact that the CIA’s use of torture -- including waterboarding -- is no secret," ACLU staff attorney Amrit Singh complained. "This new information only underscores the need for full and immediate disclosure of the CIA’s illegal interrogation methods."

    In December 2007, the ACLU filed a motion -- which is stil pending -- to hold the CIA in contempt for its destruction of the tapes in violation of a court order to produce or identify all records that had been requested by the ACLU. The tapes were also withheld from the 9/11 Commission.

    The government has now promised to release additional information about the tapes by March 20. According to a letter sent to the court by two assistant US Attorneys, "Point 2 requires the production of a 'list of any summaries, transcripts, or memoranda regarding the records, and of any reconstruction of the records' content. The CIA will complete this list on or before March 20, 2009. On that same date, the CIA will provide a public version of the list to the Court and Plaintiffs and, if necessary to explain fully the records at issue, will make available a classified version for the Court's ex parte, in camera review."

    A copy of the government's letter to the court is available at: www.aclu.org/torturefoia/released/030609/hellerstein_letter.pdf

    A copy of the redacted videotape inventory is available at: www.aclu.org/torturefoia/released/030609/videotape_inventory.pdf

    A redacted description of the tapes is available at: www.aclu.org/torturefoia/released/030609/paragraph_77.pdf

    The ACLU's contempt motion and related legal documents are available online at: www.aclu.org/torturefoia
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  4. #114
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    CIA reveals it has 3,000 pages of documents relating to destroyed interrogation tapes

    http://rawstory.com/news/2008/CIA_re...ages_0320.html

    3/21/2009

    The Central Intelligence Agency disclosed Friday that it has 3,000 summaries, transcripts, reconstructions and memoranda relating to 92 interrogation videotapes that were destroyed by the agency, the American Civil Liberties Union revealed Friday evening.

    The agency, however, says they won't make them public or provide them to the civil rights group. The disclosure came as part of a lawsuit.

    The CIA says they incinerated the tapes to protect the identities of agents involved in the interrogations. Their destruction came at the same time a federal judge was seeking information from Bush administration lawyers about the interrogation of alleged al Qaeda operative Abu Zubaydah.

    The CIA also refused to publicly disclose any witnesses who may have viewed the destroyed tapes or had custody of them prior to their destruction.

    “The government is still needlessly withholding information about these tapes from the public, despite the fact that the CIA's use of torture is well known,” Amrit Singh, staff attorney with the ACLU, said in a release. “Full disclosure of the CIA's illegal interrogation methods is long overdue and the agency must be held accountable for flouting the rule of law.”

    The CIA could not be reached for comment.

    Perhaps not surprisingly, the information came to light late Friday and was sent out by the ACLU in a release at 6:44PM ET. Organizations and agencies often release unfavorable information on Friday evenings, because American newspapers have the lowest circulation on Saturdays.

    More from the ACLU's release issued Friday follows.In December 2007, the ACLU filed a motion to hold the CIA in contempt for its destruction of the tapes in violation of a court order requiring the agency to produce or identify all records requested by the ACLU. That motion is still pending.

    The agency’s latest submission came in response to an August 20, 2008 court order issued in the context of the contempt motion. That order required the agency to produce “a list of any summaries, transcripts, or memoranda regarding the [destroyed tapes] and of any reconstruction of the records’ contents” as well as a list of witnesses who may have viewed the videotapes or retained custody of the videotapes before their destruction. The CIA will provide these lists to the court for in camera review on March 26, 2009.

    Earlier this month, the CIA acknowledged it destroyed 92 tapes of interrogations. The tapes, some of which show CIA operatives subjecting suspects to extremely harsh interrogation methods, should have been identified and processed for the ACLU in response to its Freedom of Information Act request demanding information on the treatment and interrogation of detainees in U.S. custody. The tapes were also withheld from the 9/11 Commission, appointed by former President Bush and Congress, which had formally requested that the CIA hand over transcripts and recordings documenting the interrogation of CIA prisoners.

    The government’s letter to U.S. District Court Judge Alvin K. Hellerstein of the Southern District of New York is available online here.

    The ACLU's contempt motion and related legal documents are available online here.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  5. #115
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    Top CIA officials appear before jury over destruction of al-Qaida tapes

    • 92 video tapes may have been illegally destroyed
    • London station chief included in inquiry

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009...-interrogation

    Chris McGreal in Washington guardian.co.uk, Friday 3 July 2009 17.17 BST

    Senior Central Intelligence Agency officials, including the London station chief, have been brought before a grand jury in Virginia investigating the potentially illegal destruction of 92 video tapes recording the torture and interrogation of al-Qaida detainees.

    A special prosecutor, John Durham, has called the CIA officials as part of an 18-month-long criminal probe in to the destruction of evidence of the agency's interrogators using waterboarding and other forms of torture against Abu Zubaydah and Abd al-Rahim al Nashiri who are described by the Americans as "high value" detainees now held at Guantánamo Bay.

    Those ordered to testify include the former CIA chief, Porter J. Goss. Another is a woman who is not publicly named who heads the agency's London station. She previously worked as the chief of staff for the head of the CIA's clandestine branch, Jose Rodriguez, who is the focus of the investigation.

    The New York Times reports that former CIA officers have identified the woman as having helped carry out Rodriguez's order to destroy the tapes which had been kept in a safe in at the agency's station in Thailand where the torture and interrogations were carried out.

    Rodriquez is reported to have been concerned that agents might have been identified and endangered if the tapes leaked.

    But the CIA will also have been concerned that some of its agents may have been open to prosecution under domestic and international laws against torture besides the enormous damage to its already battered reputation if video were made public of the extended torture and brutal techniques used against the captives. The impact is likely to have been much greater than the outcry caused by the pictures of abuse by US soldiers at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib prison.

    President Obama has since pledged not to prosecute individual agents for their part in torture and interrogations because they were assured by the Bush administration that their actions were legal.

    The investigation was launched because the destruction of the tapes may amount to a criminal offense because it was evidence that could have been used in any prosecutions for torture. Robriquez has told colleagues that he received legal guidance from CIA lawyers who told him he had the authority to order the destruction of the tapes.

    However it remains open to question whether anyone will be brought to trial for that or other alleged offenses given the Obama administration's desire to reassure CIA agents that they will not be pursued over past crimes.

    The existence of the tapes was only made public after they were destroyed.

    On Thursday, the Obama administration said it will delay until the end of next month the release of a 2004 CIA report detailing the torture and other abuse of prisoners held in clandestine prisons oversees.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  6. #116
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    Judge Rules CIA Can Suppress Information About Torture Tapes and Memos
    Ruling Allows CIA to Conceal Evidence of Its Own Illegal Conduct, Says ACLU

    http://www.commondreams.org/newswire/2010/07/15-19

    NEW YORK - July 15 - A federal judge today ruled that the government can withhold information from the public about intelligence sources and methods, even if those sources and methods were illegal. The ruling came in response to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) litigation filed by the American Civil Liberties Union for Justice Department memos that authorized torture, and for records relating to the contents of destroyed videotapes depicting the brutal interrogation of detainees at CIA black sites.

    The government continues to withhold key information, such as the names of detainees who were subjected to the abusive interrogation methods as well as information about the application of the interrogation techniques. Judge Alvin K. Hellerstein of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York today ruled that the government can continue to suppress evidence of its illegal program.

    The following can be attributed to Jameel Jaffer, Deputy Legal Director of the ACLU:

    "We are very dismayed by today's ruling, which invests the CIA with sweeping authority to conceal evidence of its own illegal conduct. There is no question that the CIA has authority under the law to withhold information relating to ‘intelligence sources and methods.' But while this authority is broad, it is not unlimited, and it certainly should not be converted into a license to suppress evidence of criminal activity. Unfortunately, that is precisely what today's ruling threatens to do. The CIA should not be permitted to unilaterally determine whether evidence of its own criminal conduct can be hidden from the public."

    Judge Hellerstein's ruling is available online at: www.aclu.org/national-security/aclu-v-dod-district-court-order-allowing-suppression-information-about-intelligenc

    More information about the ACLU's FOIA litigation is available online at: www.aclu.org/accountability/

    ###

    The ACLU conserves America's original civic values working in courts, legislatures and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in the United States by the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  7. #117
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    Key omission in memo to destroy CIA terror tapes

    http://rawstory.com/rs/2010/0726/key...-terror-tapes/

    By The Associated Press
    Monday, July 26th, 2010 -- 7:53 am

    White House, CIA lawyers in dark before terrorist videos destroyed; evidence of obstruction?

    When the CIA sent word in 2005 to destroy scores of videos showing waterboarding and other harsh interrogation tactics, there was an unusual omission in the carefully worded memo: the names of two agency lawyers.

    Once a CIA lawyer has weighed in on even a routine matter, officers rarely give an order without copying the lawyer in on the decision. It's standard procedure, a way for managers to cover themselves if a decision goes bad.

    But when the CIA's top clandestine officer, Jose Rodriguez, told a colleague at the agency's secret prison in Thailand to destroy interrogation videos, he left the lawyers off the note.

    The destruction of the tapes wiped away the most graphic evidence of the CIA's now-shuttered network of overseas prisons, where suspected terrorists were interrogated for information using some of the most aggressive tactics in U.S. history.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Critics of that George W. Bush-era program point to the tapes' destruction and say his administration was trying to cover its tracks.

    The reality is not so simple.

    Interviews with current and former U.S. officials and others close to the investigation show that Rodriguez's order was at odds with years of directives from CIA lawyers and the White House. Rodriguez knew there would be political fallout for the decision, according to documents and interviews, so he sought a legal opinion in a way to gain needed legal cover to get the tapes destroyed — but not so much that anyone would stop him.

    Leaving the lawyers he had consulted off his cabled order to destroy the tapes was so unusual that a top CIA official noted it in an internal e-mail just days later. The omission is now an important part of the Justice Department's 2 1/2-year investigation into whether destroying the tapes was a crime.

    Prosecutors have focused on a little-used section of the 2002 Sarbanes-Oxley accounting law. That makes it illegal to destroy documents, even if no court has ordered them kept and no investigator has asked for them.

    Rodriguez, who wasn't disciplined for what some former officials told prosecutors amounted to insubordination, is frequently back at CIA headquarters as a contractor.

    The Associated Press has compiled the most complete published account to date of how the tapes were destroyed, a narrative that among other things underlines the challenges prosecutors face in bringing charges.

    Most of the people interviewed spoke on condition of anonymity because of the continuing investigation. Some of the officials directly involved declined comment or were unavailable.

    ___

    Taping CIA interrogations is unusual, but the 2002 captures of al-Qaida operatives Abu Zubaydah and Rahim al-Nashiri were unusual cases. The CIA wanted to unravel al-Qaida from within and the Bush administration allowed increasingly severe tactics to try to ensure cooperation.

    Officers began videotaping to prove that Zubaydah arrived in Thailand wounded and to show they were following Washington's new interrogation rules.

    Almost as soon as taping began, officials began discussing whether to destroy the tapes. Dozens of officers and contractors appeared on the tapes. If those videos surfaced, officials feared, nearly all those people could be identified.

    In November 2002, CIA lawyer John L. McPherson was assigned to watch the videos and compare them with written summaries. If the reports accurately described the videos, that would bolster the case that the tapes were unnecessary.

    Several of the 92 videos had been taped over, so the quality was poor. Others contained gaps. When one tape ran out, documents show, interrogators didn't always immediately insert a new one. Many contained brief interrogation sessions followed by hours of static.

    McPherson concluded in January 2003 that the summaries matched what he saw. With that assurance, the CIA planned to destroy the tapes. But lawmakers who were briefed on the plan raised concerns, and the CIA scrapped the idea, agency documents show.

    The White House didn't learn about the tapes for a year, and even then, it was somewhat by chance.

    ___

    Near the end of a May 2004 meeting between CIA general counsel Scott Muller and White House lawyers, the conversation turned to the scandal over photos of abuse in the military's Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

    National Security Council lawyer John Bellinger's question was almost offhand: Does the CIA have anything that could cause a firestorm like Abu Ghraib?

    Yes, Muller said.

    David Addington, a former CIA lawyer who was Vice President Dick Cheney's legal counsel, was stunned that videos existed, officials said. But he told Muller not to destroy them, and Bellinger and White House counsel Alberto Gonzales agreed, according to documents and interviews with former officials.

    That order stood for more than a year. Muller's successor, John Rizzo, received similar instructions from the next White House counsel, Harriet Miers: Check with the White House before destroying the tapes.

    All the while, courts and lawmakers looking into detainee treatment were unknowingly coming close to the tapes:

    _A Virginia judge asked whether there were interrogation videos of witnesses relevant to Sept. 11 conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui. But that didn't cover Zubaydah, who the judge said was immaterial to the Moussaoui case, so the CIA didn't tell the court about his interrogation tape.

    _A Washington judge told the CIA to safeguard evidence of mistreatment at Guantanamo Bay. But Zubaydah and al-Nashiri were overseas at the time, so the agency regarded the order as not applicable to the tapes of their interrogations.

    _A New York judge told the CIA to search its investigative files for records such as the tapes. But the CIA considered the tapes part of its operational files and therefore exempt from FOIA disclosure and did not reveal their existence to the court.

    _The Sept. 11 commission asked for many documents, but never issued a subpoena.

    ___

    Despite the White House orders, momentum for destroying the tapes grew again in late 2005 as the CIA Thailand station chief, Mike Winograd, prepared to retire.

    Winograd had the tapes and believed they should be destroyed, officials said. At CIA headquarters, Rodriguez and his chief of staff agreed. Winograd did not return several messages from the AP seeking comment.

    On Nov. 4, 2005, Rodriguez asked CIA lawyer Steven Hermes whether Rodriguez had the authority destroy the tapes. Hermes said Rodriguez did, according to documents and interviews. Rodriguez also asked CIA lawyer Robert Eatinger whether there was any legal requirement to keep the tapes. Eatinger said no.

    Both Eatinger and Hermes remain with the agency and were unavailable to be interviewed. But both told colleagues they believed Rodriguez was merely restarting the discussion. Because of previous orders not to destroy the tapes, they were unaware Rodriguez planned to move immediately, officials told the AP.

    Rodriguez told Winograd to request approval to destroy the tapes. That request arrived Nov. 5. Rodriguez sent his approval three days later.

    He and his chief of staff were the only names on the cable. Had he sent a copy also to the CIA lawyers — Rizzo, Hermes or Eatinger — or even to CIA Director Porter Goss, any of them could have intervened.

    "Before Jose did what he did, he was confident it was legal, that there was no impediment to him doing it," his lawyer, Robert Bennett told the AP. "And he always acted in the best interest of the U.S. and its people."

    It took about 3 1/2 hours to destroy the tapes. On Nov. 9, Winograd informed Rodriguez the job was complete. Goss and Rizzo wouldn't find out until the next day.

    ___

    Rizzo was angry and Miers livid, according to internal CIA e-mails. Goss agreed with Rodriguez's decision, the e-mails said, but predicted he'd get criticized for it. Rodriguez was undeterred.

    "As Jose said, the heat from destroying is nothing compared to what it would be if the tapes ever got into public domain — he said out of context, they would make us look terrible; it would be devastating to us," said an e-mail from an aide to the agency's No. 3 official, Kyle "Dusty" Foggo.

    Such statements could be used as evidence if prosecutor John Durham seeks charges in the case. Even if Rodriguez genuinely worried about the safety of his officers and wasn't trying to obstruct an investigation, if he feared the tapes might someday be made public, that could be enough to violate the Sarbanes-Oxley obstruction law.

    As the case winds down, McPherson, who reviewed the tapes in 2003, again has been thrust into a central role. McPherson has received immunity in exchange for cooperating with prosecutors, an unusual protection for a government lawyer.

    CIA spokesman George Little said the agency is cooperating with investigators.

    Rodriguez, now an executive with contractor Edge Consulting, a job that regularly gives him access to the national intelligence director's office and CIA headquarters, still hasn't received an official retirement party.

    ___

    Online:

    CIA: https://www.cia.gov/
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  8. #118
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    Judge Rules CIA Can Withhold Info about Illegal Methods

    http://www.allgov.com/Top_Stories/Vi...Methods_100726

    Monday, July 26, 2010

    Judge Alvin Hellerstein A federal judge has backed CIA efforts to conceal information about treatment of detainees, even if the suppressed records contain details about illegal activity on the part of the intelligence agency.

    U.S. District Judge Alvin Hellerstein ruled that he was unwilling to “second-guess the CIA Director regarding the appropriateness of any particular intelligence source or method,” while rejecting the American Civil Liberties Union’s request to obtain records related to the treatment of detainees, those who died in U.S. custody and the names of anyone kidnapped and sent to secret prisons.

    ACLU Deputy Legal Director Jameel Jaffer said his organization was “dismayed” by Hellerstein’s decision, which could be construed as giving the CIA “a license to suppress evidence of criminal activity.”
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  9. #119
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    Secret terrorist tapes of 9/11 plotter Ramzi Binalshibh found under CIA desk

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nati..._cia_desk.html

    BY Aliyah Shahid
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
    Tuesday, August 17th 2010, 7:37 AM

    Secret's out.

    Recordings of a 9/11 plotter being interrogated in a secret overseas prison were discovered under a desk by the CIA— even though the government told the Justice Department twice that such tapes did not exist.

    According to The Associated Press, the recordings—two video and one audio—show Ramzi Binalshibh being questioned in a jail in Rabat, Morocco in 2002.

    In 2005, the CIA destroyed 92 recordings of Al Qaeda members Abu Zubaydah and Abd al Nashiri when they were being waterboarded, according to U.S. officials who did not want to be identified because the tapes were supposed to remain top secret. They thought all the footage was wiped out.

    But in 2007, a CIA staffer found the Binalshibh tapes in a box. And now, a Justice Department prosecutor, who was already probing whether destroying the Zubaydah and al-Nashiri recordings were illegal, is investigating why the latest tapes were never revealed.

    The recordings could reveal how foreign governments helped the U.S. interrogate alleged terrorists.

    The discovery could also affect Binalshibh's trial if his lawyers argue the 38-year-old alleged terrorist was mentally unstable due to his detention. He is now being treated for schizophrenia.

    Binalshibh was jailed on Sept. 11, 2002 and was initially questioned by the CIA in Afghanistan. Two former CIA officials said the suspect showed signs of mental instability that got worse over time. He spent five months in Morocco in late 2002 and early 2003 and is now being held in Guantanamo Bay.

    Binalshibh, who was born in Yemen, has been described by U.S. officials as a "key facilitator" in 9/11. According to court documents, he has shown unpredictable behavior, including breaking cameras in his cell and smearing them with feces. He has also been delusional, believing the CIA was shaking his bed and cell. He also thought something was crawling all over his body.

    U.S. officials maintain no harsh interrogation methods were used in Morocco. CIA spokesman George Little would not discuss the Moroccan jail—which has a history of human rights violations. Little maintained officials "continue to cooperate with inquiries into past counterterrorism practices."

    Military commissions are on hold while the president's administration decides how to handle suspected terrorists. Thomas A Durkin, Binalshibh's lawyer said the tapes could prove extremely valuable since his client has not had a hearing on whether he was mentally capable to stand trial.

    "If those tapes exist, they would be extremely relevant," he said.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


  10. #120
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    No Charges in Case of Destroyed CIA Interrogation Tapes, Justice Official Says

    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2010...official-says/

    Published November 09, 2010

    No one will be charged in the destruction of CIA interrogation tapes, a Justice Department official confirmed to Fox News Channel Tuesday.

    The tapes reportedly showed the interrogation of two al Qaeda operatives in 2002, according to the New York Times. They were destroyed in 2005.
    No One Knows Everything. Only Together May We Find The Truth JG


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